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Tuesday, 24 May 2016

A fishing shed in FNQ (Far North Queensland); living' the dream.

A fishing shed is a dream to behold for those drawn to angling as their preferred past time. In FNQ,  such a dream is no longer a dream. A sister, a brother, an almost-brother-in-law and a dog are living the dream, fishing the waters of the Tully and Hull Rivers and the Pacific Ocean around Dunk Island whenever the urge hits. They are in search of the biggest catch. The catch to talk about for almost ever. The catch to get the heart racing and the line singing. "THAT" catch.





And, luckily for me, when I go north on family visits, we tend to spend some time at "The Shed" ... "Grunter Gate" ... named in the hope that one day a giant Grunter will be caught ... One day ...

Improvements have been made to the shed since my first visit.

The garden bath house is operating. A Christmas present for my sister.


Complete with tropical shower cap all the way from Alie Jane in Newcastle.


When the humidity is higher than high, there is nothing better than bathing al fresco.


The almost-brother-in-law loves it too ... and, no, I did not take this photo. My sister did.


The garden has its toes firmly in the soil. The pumpkin patch continues to thrive.


The rosellas are flowering


and producing fruit ready for jam.


I looovve rosella jam.

The passionfruit vine is flowering,


much to the delight of the sun birds.


Fresh garden mulch and some rain mean these fun guys ... fungi ... popped up.


This giant beauty was in the road side grass on my morning walk.


He had to be easily 15 to 18 centimetres across. Quite a statement against the lush grass.

The kingfisher still visits.


And there were lots of these little fellows swooping across the grass. Glossy Swiftlets, I think.


And, to our delight, on this visit to the shed, two Ulysses butterflies decided to put on a show.

Now you see them ...


now you don't.


"But what about the fishing?" I hear you ask.

Well, yes we did fish. It's in our blood. Our father, the sugar cane farmer, loved to fish. It was his form of stress relief.

And yes, we did catch, but not "THAT" catch, in fact nothing even near "THAT" catch. Not even big enough to take home. Just big enough for a little fun and a return to the water for next time.


The blaring FNQ sun, midges and mosquitoes make for interesting fashion choices.


Despite the poor fishing results, the bird watching gave us some luck.


Great Egret, I think.


Plover, not sure exactly which one. My brother will know.


Beach Thick-knee, what a sad name,


with an afternoon snack of fresh crab.


And the majestic Brahminy Kite.


I did not see one of these. MLP believes Cassowaries are a FNQ myth perpetuated by the locals.


My brother and almost-brother-in-law saw a couple wandering around the edges of the cane fields and the rainforest. But, alas, I am yet to see one in the wild. One day ...

The dog loves the shed too.

Morning walks with her dad and uncle to bird watch, collect the milk and paper, and catch up with the local fishing successes and failures.


Boat rides up the river.

Snuggled up the front of the boat under cover with mum and Aunty Libby when it's raining.


Out the back in the breeze when the sun comes out.


Under Aunty Libby's sarong when the sun gets a bit too hot.


Afternoon beach walks,


with coconuts to kick around. Doggie paradise.


At the shed, she is the happiest dog in FNQ.


It's a tropical paradise for the dog and us.


With ever-changing views.


Double rainbows.


Spectacular patterns on the sand at low tide.


The odd sand selfie.


And, when two sisters get together, there's always a sewing project. Nothing like a sewing day while the boys search for the illusive Grunter. This time a quilt top. A very special quilt top. But for the moment its details are a secret.


Are you fisher folk with a fishing shed?

A hideaway from the world?

A special place for family and friends to gather and play silly card games?

Have you seen a cassowary in the wild?
Or are you one who perpetuates the FNQ myth?

Tell me your stories. I'd love to hear them.

Catch up again soon.